Halibut

Halibut

Other Names: Alaskan Halibut, Pacific Halibut, East Coast Halibut, Hirame

Range & Habitat: Atlantic and Pacific Oceans

Identification & Biology: Of the flounder family and the largest of all flatfish, halibut are gray with some white mottling. Most weigh between 50 and 100 lbs., but Atlantic halibut can exceed half a ton. Young chicken halibut are much smaller (2 to 10 lbs.)

Market Description: Tender chicken halibut is considered best for eating. Atlantic and Pacific halibut are also good, with extremely lean, firm, tight-grained white meat. Halibut are delicately flavorful, albeit a bit dry. Greenland, California, and black halibut are considered less desirable, as far as table-fair quality.

Habitat: Northern Pacific, Northern Atlantic

Flavor Profile: large flake, tender texture, sweet mild taste

Yield: 56%

Fishing Technique: hook & line, long line

Special Note: Un-healthy halibuts flesh will turn chalky in raw

Suitable Sub: Any halibut variety

Buying tips: Steaks should be sweet-smelling, with glistening pure white flesh that's free of browning, gaping, and signs of dryness.

Notes: The Atlantic halibut population has dropped considerably in recent years, resulting in a higher price tag for this popular fish.

Sold as: Steaks (skin on) are most common; smaller specimens can be available as fillets or fresh and whole (headless and dressed). Halibut cheeks, sold in gourmet shops, are considered a delicacy.

Substitutes: Cod, dogfish, flatfish, haddock, turbot

Recommended Preparation: A firm, fine-textured fish, halibut poaches, grills, broils, braises, and steams particularly well. It is also good roasted or sautéed. The edible skin need not be removed; in fact, leaving the skin on helps steaks keep their shape while cooking.

Seasonality

spring/summer/fall
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